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How does this work ?

You can claim any time in this faucet. Your reward are added into your faucet's balance. When you reach 10 satoshi, you can withdraw your money to FaucetHub.Io account.

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Bitcoin is a form of digital currency, created and held electronically. No one controls it. Bitcoins aren’t printed, like dollars or euros – they’re produced by people, and increasingly businesses, running computers all around the world, using software that solves mathematical problems. It’s the first example of a growing category of money known as cryptocurrency.

What makes it different from normal currencies?

Bitcoin can be used to buy things electronically. In that sense, it’s like conventional dollars, euros, or yen, which are also traded digitally. However, bitcoin’s most important characteristic, and the thing that makes it different to conventional money, is that it is decentralized. No single institution controls the bitcoin network. This puts some people at ease, because it means that a large bank can’t control their money.

Who created it?

A software developer called Satoshi Nakamoto proposed bitcoin, which was an electronic payment system based on mathematical proof. The idea was to produce a currency independent of any central authority, transferable electronically, more or less instantly, with very low transaction fees.

Bitcoin faucets are a reward system, in the form of a website or app, that dispenses rewards in the form of a satoshi, which is a hundredth of a millionth BTC, for visitors to claim in exchange for completing a captcha or task as described by the website. There are also faucets that dispense alternative cryptocurrencies. Bitcoin faucets were developed by Gavin Andresen in 2010.


To introduce users to bitcoin: Faucets are a great way to help introduce new people to bitcoin, or to altcoins. A majority of faucets provide information to new users as well as offering them some free coins so that they can ‘try before they buy’, experimenting with a test transaction or two before putting real money on the line. Since this whole experience is so new and a bit complicated to people, who perhaps don’t quite trust it with their hard money, this is a beneficial way to promote digital currency and bring in new users. To get traffic: Faucets are high traffic websites. It is not all that difficult to get a huge number of page views per day to a site which is giving away free money. If a website has other content or services to promote to Bitcoin users, especially new users, a faucet is a great way to bring them to make them familiar with a brand name. To make money: Making a healthy profit from a faucet site on its own is a lot harder than just making a popular faucet, but it is still possible. There are a lot of these sites around today, so it's a very competitive market, and earning enough from advertising to cover the cost of the coins you are giving away and hosting costs is nearly impossible. Adding additional content to a website, or creating some kind of unique or interesting twist, is the only way to generate an income for a Bitcoin faucet.[5]

In some ways, paying with bitcoin is similar to sending an email, except that instead of sending a message to an email address, you’re sending an amount of money to a bitcoin address. One of the nice things about paying with bitcoin is that you don’t need to give up as much personal information. You only need to give your name and address if you’re purchasing physical goods. If it’s a digital item, then your email will usually suffice, and if you’re making a donation, you may not need to provide any information at all.